Hodsoll McKenzie “Bridge” | Collection 2019

Hodsoll McKenzie has always acted as a bridge between the mind and the senses, sophistication and a down-to-earth-attitude, Great Britain and the USA as well as British history and an international Zeitgeist of style. With this collection we have focused on these roots and the strong and contradictory characteristics of Hodsoll McKenzie.

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“Bridge“ harks back to the Britain of the 1930s when artists and designers were driven by the pervasive impact of industrialization. This shift radically changed means, esthetics and possibilities, but also threatened the slower handicraft processes. Although a new simplicity has arisen, function is no longer just a bothering obligation but a source of beauty. The present day is full of contradictions: serial production versus manufacturing, rediscovering nature whilst urbanizing, appreciating tradition and seeking for innovation. All is about decoration against pureness and hard materials combined with soft ones. Using gentle colours and forms to create coziness in the straight interiors of the time. A style that is more up-to-date than ever, one that built the common base of contemporary taste and meaningful design of the new century. Similar to when artists like British sculptor Barbara Hepworth and graphic designer Marion Dorn created one-of-a-kind textile designs for Edinburgh Weavers and Warner. In addition US artists such as Milton Avery, who has been called the American Matisse, as well as artist Mark Rothko have evolved a radically new understanding of colours.Hodsoll_Collage_3_b

Bridge transfers this field of tension between tradition and innovation in todays interior lifestyle. In light of this SEAGRAM has been created with a particular sense of handcraft and natural materials and made in a up-to-date colour palette, from bold to descent. For TRIPLET and KINGSWOOD historical prints from the 1920s have been re-worked to todays interior design standards. Drapery HEPWORTH with its elegant Fil Coupé picks up the cubistic design of gifted sculptural artist Barbara Hepworth and VERMONT shows a freshly distressed classic herringbone. Plain FALLINGWATER and sheer PAINTED DESERT specifically unveil their linen structure, while HOLLYHOCK and TORCELLO are very much handcrafted. The colours of the collection remain true to the classic Hodsoll McKenzie palette – soft and light watery tones, blue hues and elegant earthy neutral tones. These are accentuated by bold and warm colours such as mustard, terracotta and a bright agave green – all inspired by the landscape paintings of Milton Avery and the urban field painting of Mark Rothko. Hence why this collection bridges the gap between yesteryear and tomorrow and in every respect between cosy country houses and the sophisticated living spaces of todays cosmopolitans. Adorable yet refined, a collection that sets a scene the while providing confidence and refinement in style.

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“When we came across this beautiful mansion „Haus Steinfunder“ built in the 16th century in the Western countryside of Germany, we immediately knew that this could be a great location for our first photoshoot for Hodsoll McKenzie under new direction – not only because it looks so beautifully British. The half-timbered mansion with a stepped gable is fortified with a water moat in which two swans live. The well kept box tree garden leads to the nearby wood and whispers stories about love, heartache, bravery and dynasties.  However, it was the vibrant mixture of the opulence of the building and a pure, nearly monastic, interior that convinced us to locate the shoot here, because it creates both a cosiness as well as a aristocratic coolness. These only seemingly contradictory moods are exactly what Hodsoll McKenzie stand for.”

Hodsall McKenzie’s design director on why she only uses natural fabrics, and how Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is “a very important inspiration for me as a designer”.

To the video: Right Here, Right Now with Fredericke Winkler

 

 

 

 

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